Uses and Abuses of Religion

My youngest son has a simple formula for comparing and evaluating religions. According to him, whatever their other differences and similarities, religions fall into one of two basic categories: those that encourage adherents to engage with the questions (good), and those that hand believers fixed, inflexible answers (bad).

It’s a handy guide.

Just this week, that distinction came to mind twice. Once, when I read about Governor Pence’s fundraising; evidently, one of his major donors is the owner of Hobby Lobby–the man who went to Court to protect his “right” to impose his religious beliefs on his employees. Our Governor is quite clearly in the camp of those who are sure they have the answers, that they know exactly what God wants (and isn’t it nice that God hates the same people they do!), and who give no evidence of ever having engaged with the questions or wrestled with moral ambiguities.

Fortunately, there is another kind of faith community, and it was on beautiful display last Sunday at an Interfaith Vigil for Nondiscrimination. The Vigil was held at North United Methodist Church, and hosted by the Interfaith Coalition on Nondiscrimination, Freedom Indiana and the Reconciling Ministries Network of Indiana.

When my husband and I entered the sanctuary, I was struck by the size of the audience. My husband estimated attendance at a thousand people, most of whom appeared to be middle-aged or older.

Program participants included Darren Cushman-Wood, Pastor of North Church; Rev. Danyelle Ditmer, pastor of Epworth United Methodist Church; Rev. Linda McCrae, pastor at Central Christian Church; Whittney Murphy, the student body president of Christian Theological Seminary; Rabbi Sandy Sasso, Rabbi Emerita of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck: and Philip Gulley, Pastor of Fairfield Friends Meeting.

If there was a “call to arms,” it would probably be Rabbi Sasso’s declaration that people of faith would not stand by and allow religion and religious language to be hijacked and used as a cover for hatred and discrimination.

If there was a summing up of the sentiments of those in the sanctuary, it would be these words of Phil Gulley’s–a small part of his extraordinary and moving speech. Gulley reminded us of “the America of the open door, its hand extended in friendship.

“It is the land of the kindly neighbor, the generous friend, the liberal heart. It is the America welcoming the tired, the poor, the huddled masses. It is the people with nothing to fear but fear itself, the nation conceived in liberty, dedicated to the proposition that all people are created equal. It is the America made wiser by our differences, the America committed to justice, dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge, who measures its strength in its citizenry, not its weaponry.”

To which we might add (with a nod to my son’s categorization), it is the America in which thoughtful religious citizens are grateful for their constitutional right to explore questions of meaning and transcendence for themselves—an America that understands the importance of extending that same intellectual and moral autonomy to everyone, that rejects¬†the profoundly unAmerican theocratic urge to use religion in the service of their own dominance and privilege.

Both the Governor’s fundraising report and the Interfaith Vigil remind me that, like so much else in life, religion is neither an unalloyed good nor an unremitting evil. It can be used or it can be abused.

My own test is actually simpler than my son’s: if your beliefs make you a better, kinder person, they’re good. If they make you a rigid, judgmental asshole, they aren’t.

 

 

 

55 thoughts on “Uses and Abuses of Religion

  1. So many interesting comments today.

    Marv, I am looking forward to reading Democracide and I hope you don’t receive any threats.

  2. Nancy,

    Nancy,

    Don’t worry, I’ve been living with threats for twenty-years. They are “continuing threats” because “The Chamber” is always going to be out there. ISIS is out there too. You can’t let all this affect you or nothing worthwhile will ever be accomplished.

  3. Marv, I’ve bookmarked “Democracide”, so I’m one of the legions waiting for it. No pressure or anything.

  4. Very interesting comments today. Sheila, I am really happy that I found your blog many moons ago. This column is no exception to that joy because finding discussions on religion these days can be appalling and boring.

    Thanks for the UU information as I believe that is something my spouse would be interested in if he ever joined a church again.

    I was required to take a religion course in college to finish my bachelor degree in northern Indiana and after that class, I gave myself permission to become an atheist. It really did convince me that having been through many sacraments from the catholic church, and getting baptized in a holy roller church in my teens, I’ve come full circle with religion. I sometimes forget that I don’t believe and try to figure out how to pray for whatever may need be, like my mother’s health lately, but haven’t learned how to meditate. I might need to learn that soon. Thanks everyone for your civil and teachable comments. Brilliant.

Comments are closed.